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December 13, 2013

Silver and Decorative Arts Highlights from December 14 Sale

The December 14 Art, Antiques and Jewelry Auction includes a large selection of silver and decorative arts, including a gorgeous Martele silver bowl and examples of Reed and Barton's popular "Diamond Pattern" flatware and hollowware. MORE

Art and Antiques

September 10, 2005

Lot: 58Lot: 60

Antique Southwest Indian Pottery Wedding? Vase
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Antique Southwest Indian Pottery Wedding? Vase
LOT 59

Antique Southwest Indian Pottery Wedding? Vase



Estimate: $250 - $500
Realized: $325

Antique Southwest Native American Indian pottery wedding form vase. White, red and black decoration on buff clay body showing shiny inclusions. 8 1/4" tall. Good condition with some scuffs and chips. Provenance from consignor Bob Clifton: The pots were dug up in the middle 1800's by some man (or men) related to the Civil War (before, during or after) in some way. They were found in the Southwestern U.S. while they were digging for unrelated reasons. Twelve pots with similar markings were found. All were gathered at the same place and time. All the artifacts items were shipped back to Indiana by train. This was not a planned excavation or archeology organization or expedition, just regular guys and shovels. Other artifacts were found at the same site and sold for their monetary value over the years. But, the pots were given to my Great, Great Grandmother, as a small girl. Both, she and my grandmother, told stories of playing for hours with the pots when they were little. At that time, the pots where thought to have little to no value. When Anna Martha Clifton (Geis was her maiden name), my grandmother, died in the mid 1900's, my Aunt Mame Tobin (Clifton was her maiden name) took the pottery because she had two brothers -- Uncle, Alvin Clifton (deceased) and Amert Clifton (deceased), was my father -- neither of the men wanted the pottery. Mame didn't play with the pots -- she was too old by the time she received them… Mame gave me the pots in 1971 shortly before her death. In 1971, while still in Mame's possession, 6 pots (along with other items) were stolen from her home on E. Washington St. in Indianapolis… And then the next night 3 more pots were taken. The three that were stolen as a group the second night were located by the police in a flea market at an address on East Washington St. about 4 miles away. To my knowledge, all 9 stolen pots have still not surfaced since nor have any been recovered as of today.